Security Technology Executive

MAY-JUN 2018

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www. SecurityInfoWatch.com • May/June 2018 • SECURIT Y TECHNOLOGY E XECUTIVE 23 increased in a world in which customer expectations are high and the consequences of failure unforgiving. Direct and indirect costs include customer dissatis- faction, steps to counter a possible loss of business, replenishment, and other time-consuming actions to determine causes, accountability or the lack of it. Further costs in time and effort for an organiza- tion can be experienced with loss investigations, law enforcement involvement, determining liability and » A study by Michigan State University suggests that supply chains have become increasingly fragile. « develop proactive security solutions that can reduce losses to their multi-billion-dollar supply chains. Exact figures of supply chain losses vary greatly, with some estimates in the region of billions of dol- lars annually. A study by Michigan State University suggests that supply chains have become increas- ingly fragile. In today's environment of reduced vis- ibility, the actions of all supply chain actors, reduced controls and today's "lean" practices do not bode well for future loss containment. Whatever the loss figure may be, the threat to product availability or its diversion, substitution or loss is significant and of sufficient order to demand immediate and ongoing attention. Assessing Risk and Addressing It Risk management plays an essential role in help- ing visualize the risks inherent in today's complex supply chain operations, a role that not only consid- ers process weaknesses and vulnerabilities, but the overall cost outcome. But supply chain failures have In today's environment of reduced visibility, the actions of all supply chain actors, reduced controls and today's "lean" practices do not bode well for future loss containment. Image Courtesy of BigStock.com constructing countermeasures to address the pos- sibility of yet another threat. All these steps must take place in a dynamic environment that offers no respite or pause. Therefore, the need to design, develop and enact workable, proactive steps to avoid, halt or "transfer a potential threat elsewhere" has never been greater. To do so, actions must be sufficient to dissuade crimi- nals from their intended path and to redirect their focus somewhere else, actions that may afford them similar rewards, less risk and possibly less effort. Cargo thieves often emulate the steps taken by crim- inals during a kidnapping who conduct meticulous due diligence and surveillance of the intended victim. Countermeasures can be effective in either sce- nario if they are sufficient to convince assailants that the risk is less, and the rewards will be the same by selecting a target elsewhere. Protecting people has its own challenges, but the "transfer the risk" concept in personal and execu- tive protection is a primary "requisite" that can help protect people from harm by taking steps to distance the threat from a target. The risk assessment is used to analyze the modus operandi of previous threats and the current threat, the known possibilities and, most importantly, what can be surmised or imagined. A similar approach is recommended to protect supply chain operations from criminal attack. Some would decry this approach as self-inter- ested, since it has the effect of penalizing the less protected. Improved security, together with higher operational efficiency, are differentiators in the

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